How can travelling inspire and refresh the mind?

I have to confess something to you – I love to travel! It is a passion that is an integral part of my life. The world and people truly fascinate me, that’s why I constantly go on weekend trips around Poland and travel to another country for a few days at least once every quarter.

Before you ask – yes, I also only have 26 days of annual leave and a full-time job – but it’s possible 😉. When I’m on the plane, I love to watch white fluffy clouds and reflect on how tiny we are in the face of it all – us and our everyday problems. I always have this feeling of excitement – what kind of adventure will it be this time, what will happen, who will I meet, what will I try. I organise all trips myself, exploring the culture of the country.

Places

I didn’t really start travelling until I was 24. I remember to this day the joy of my first holiday in Sardinia. Beautiful white, long and wild beaches combined with nature – were indescribable. The fun of driving a Jeep on wide roads, the wind in your hair and freedom. The views from hills filled me with joy and peace. And what I liked the most was low building density and scarcity of technology.

Being there, I just felt alive. Since then, I have visited more than ten countries, and each new one brings me more and more wonderful memories and reflections. I live in Warsaw, which is full of people, kilometres of traffic jams, hustle and bustle, and a constant fight for something. The pace is at times extreme – life on the run, notifications, phone calls, distractors and even more stimuli served up for dessert. By the way, you don’t actually have to live in a big city to have ‘it’ up to your ears. Is it worth keeping up with? Is it possible to get out of it? Read on

Escape

No matter where you go – a change of environment is simply a stimulation for your mind, which becomes more stimulated by new sensory stimuli. Every new sight, smell or sound sparks curiosity and creativity and can lead to great ideas and inspiration. Travelling also fosters personal development through learning about new cultures, traditions and people. Different points of view or values can broaden your knowledge and imagination and help you to better understand yourself and the world around you. It gives you a different perspective on your life and makes you appreciate what you have. It is also an excellent opportunity to break down the language barrier and develop communication and adaptation skills.

Escaping everyday life knocks out the monotony – it is also a way to discover new passions, interests and ways of spending leisure time. Whoever can, should escape! 😉

Here and now

The feeling of ‘here and now’ is one of sensations I have experienced, standing on a mountain top after a challenging climb in Montenegro, or listening to the sound of waves on the coast of Malta. I felt that I was fully present, experiencing every impulse, emotion and stimulus with an intensity that makes time stop. In today’s busy digital world, it is easy to lose touch with the present moment, which can lead to feelings of dissatisfaction, anxiety and a loss of a sense of purpose in life. That is why it is important to be able to stop for a moment and be aware of what is happening around us. Have you tried to press pause in your life?

Returns

When the trip is over I return home full of energy and new ideas. I am ready to move forward and take on new challenges. As Elza sang in the fantasy cartoon: “I have the power” 😉. I feel fulfilment and peace. Sometimes there is also a ‘return depression’ – moments of melancholy when I miss the excitement and adventures of the trip. In moments like these, I roll up my sleeves and plan next trips because there’s still so much to see!

Summary

I am not going to coach you or give you any advice. Instead, I will share with you my favorite Mark Twain quote: “Twenty years from now, you will regret more what you didn’t do than what you did. So untie the ropes, leave the safe port. Catch the winds in your sails. Travel. Dream. Explore. Enjoy!

text written by:

Ewelina Partyka, People & Culture Specialist